The Globes Edition

So, this is 2013. This month, in our Globes edition, we welcome an international array of writers to our pages. US writer Wes Henricksen reimagines the fable in his short story ‘The Scorpion’, which retains the subversive innocence of all good fables. Mexico-based poet Jack Little (founder of The Ofi Press) recalls a moment from … Continue reading

The Borders Edition

This month Magda Healey poses some fascinating questions at the site of the Apollo at Bassae, as she explores the borders of time and our reaction to them. She is puzzled by the Ephorate of Antiques’ attitude towards ‘restoration’; indeed, she wonders quite what restoration is, which in turn allows her to question the limits … Continue reading

The From the Ruins Edition

In 1995, singer Natalie Merchant released her song ‘San Andreas Fault’, in which the tectonic plates under San Francisco took on a sinister, human aspect, “mov[ing their] fingers/ through the ground” – a reference, perhaps, to the huge 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, or others since. In Merchant’s song, the fault-line of the past and … Continue reading

The Tresspass Edition

Nothing as bombastic as Frank O’ Hara’s manifesto for Personism, but with a soft-hued version of his sentiment: “I’m not saying that I don’t have practically the most lofty ideas of anyone… but what difference does that make? They’re just ideas. The only good thing about it is that when I get lofty enough I’ve … Continue reading

The Are We Ersatz? edition

“…Ah! You are a happy fellow,” said Mr Farebrother, turning on his heel and beginning to fill his pipe. “You don’t know what it is to want spiritual tobacco – bad emendations of old texts, or small items about a variety of Aphis brassicae, with the well-known signature of Philomicron, for the Twaddler’s Magazine; or … Continue reading

Steven Severin on Cocteau: the interview; Emily Wolahan: new poetry; Berlusconi gets bitten: pontifications & protest.

To paraphrase Ruth Gordon, octogenarian star of seminal 1973 film Harold & Maude, and with exactly the same sentiment, New Linear Perspectives greets the dawn of a new March with a breath of fire – HUH! This edition sees NLP editor Andrew F Giles travel to the central European city of Bratislava to interview co-founder … Continue reading

Art and Africa

The iPad is proving to be a genuine contender in the arsenal of the serious artist, as vouched for by the likes of David Hockney.  In the Arts section, Edinburgh based artist Ross Macgregor examines the history of the medium and the possibilities it offers in his very own iPad Review. The words are illustrated … Continue reading

Spiders and Silicon

Pat Neil returns to the travel section with The Spider on the Differential,  the much anticipated sequel to ‘Spain in Cold Storage’, as she delves further into the experience of sixties Spain. Donkeys, differentials and (almost) dead clients… Meanwhile, the latest in-depth arts interview sees Nicola Moir quiz hot Australian art duo The Silicon Artists … Continue reading

Flamingos and architecture

Pink birds in the Carmargue and scheming architects in Uppsala, what more could you hope for on a wednesday afternoon? in Operation Carmargue, JPM Justice takes his camera down to Arles and the marshy hinterland of the Carmargue to record the famous flamingos and admire the classically influenced graffiti. Part Two of The Keystone, Chris … Continue reading

Animal Talk

“The first was a hare,” he began, in what felt like a parable of migration and separation, making listeners imagine the scene by opening its metaphorical nature. Images of startled runners, a chased animal, an unseen traveller crossing the border led me to muse upon  the residue of hare images: ancient Zhou bronzes, Durer’s drawing, … Continue reading